Should Dylan Get the Nobel Prize?

In Literature & the Arts by gravierhouseLeave a Comment

When I heard that Bob Dylan had been awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, I texted my sister, Liz, who texted back the exact same thing that I was thinking: “That should make for an interesting acceptance speech.” Reading the various reactions to the news, you could pretty much separate the naysayers into two distinct categories: On the one hand …

The Mirror Thief, by Martin Seay

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The book review I read described The Mirror Thief as a combination of two other books I liked very much, Umberto Eco’s Foucault’s Pendulum and David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas. The overall construct is genius: linking, and taking place, alternatively, in Venice, Italy, (from the Fifteenth Century); Venice Beach, California, (in the 1950s); and the Venetian Hotel, in Las Vegas, (essentially …

The Goldfinch, by Donna Tartt

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I was in the San Jose airport about to board a three-hour flight with nothing to read and picked up the Goldfinch, which was kind of in the back in my mind as something I had wanted to check out at some point. When I was around halfway thru the book, I went to Wikipedia to look up something, (think …

The Martian (and a Lesson from Behavioral Economics)

In For Trial Lawyers, Literature & the Arts by gravierhouseLeave a Comment

I thought The Martian was a pretty good movie. Well-made. Well-filmed. Well-acted. (I didn’t really like the Matt Damon character all that much, and found the voice-over narration via video diary a little formulaic and annoying, although I frankly can’t, off the top of my head, think of a better alternative.) But it was reasonably suspenseful and interesting. Thought-provoking. And/But …

The Ethicist(s)

In Legal Ethics & Professionalism, Literature & the Arts by gravierhouseLeave a Comment

I am glad to see that there is, again, one Ethicist. The Ethicist, for those who don’t know, is a weekly column that appears in the Sunday New York Times Magazine. As with other advice columns, readers submit various fact situations with questions and conundrums, to which the author responds, analyzing the problem from an ethical perspective. When I first …

Lolita

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I was reading an interview with some author in the New York Times Book Review (can’t remember who it was) who said that he loved the wordplay at the beginning of Lolita, but as it went on, he got tired, and never finished it.  Same thing happened to me.  I tried to read the book in college (think I was home on …

Greatest Hits

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I was at Starbucks the other day and saw a Dylan greatest hits type collection which seemed to be mostly a compilation of eighteen songs from the Greatest Hits and Greatest Hits Vol. 2 records, along with a few more recent tracks like Hurricane. For some artists, the Greatest Hits are pretty much the only songs you would ever want …

A Frolic of His Own

In For Trial Lawyers, Literature & the Arts by gravierhouseLeave a Comment

A Frolic of His Own has some of the funniest passages I have ever read. I’m not sure whether, if I were not a practicing attorney, I would have appreciated them less, or even more. The formal pleadings and deposition colloquies were exaggerated enough to bring out the comedy, yet genuine enough so as not to be absurd. As in …

The Unbearable Lightness of Being

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Milan Kundera begins with a somewhat abstract and philosophical exposition on the unbearable lightness, or weight, of being. It is pretty much all tell, and no show. And yet I loved it. I thought it was pure genius. Putting it negatively, the myth of eternal return states that a life which disappears once and for all, which does not return, …