Plaintiff’s Social Media History is Discoverable, but with Limitations

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Defendant in a personal injury case sought the plaintiff’s social media history.  While the plaintiff technically waived her objections to the discovery requests by failing to serve them within thirty days, Magistrate Judge Erin Wilder-Doomes, sitting in the Middle District of Louisiana, nevertheless limited them as overbroad: “As Defendant points out, social media is generally discoverable. However, a request for …

U.S. Fifth Circuit Affirms Sanction of Attorneys Who Withheld Material Evidence from Rule 26 Disclosures

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The plaintiff in the underlying lawsuit claimed she was sexually assaulted on multiple occasions while incarcerated at the Maverick County Detention Center, operated by the defendant, GEO Group.  During the plaintiff’s deposition, she was confronted with recordings of telephone calls which had not be identified or produced as part of the initial disclosures under Rule 26.  The plaintiff filed a …

Seventh Circuit Says Wife’s Unauthorized Access to Husband’s E-Mails Could Violate Federal Wiretap Act

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A husband embroiled in an acrimonious divorce brought suit against his wife claiming a violation of the Electronic Surveillance Act by surreptitiously placing an auto-forwarding “rule” on his e-mail accounts that automatically forwarded the messages on his e-mail to her. He also alleges that the wife’s divorce attorney violated the Act by “disclosing” the intercepted emails in response to his …

Covington & Burling Admonished for Representing Non-Party Witnesses in Depositions

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The defendant, Jacobs, hired Covington & Burling to devlop factual information and defenses relating to Jacobs’ work for the Tennessee Valley Authority.  Among other things, Covington helped identify non-party witnesses who might have factual information regarding the TVA-Jacobs contract.  Covington worked with the witnesses to prepare and submit declarations in support of Jacobs’ Motion to Dismiss, asserting derivative sovereign immunity …

Alaska Bar Association Prohibits Use of “Web Bugs”

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A “web bug” is a technology tool that tracks certain information about the document to which it is attached.  They can be used in e-mail newsletters to help track readers, for example, but can also be used in e-mails to “invisibly” track, among other things: when the email was opened; how long the email was reviewed (including whether it was …

Tennessee Formal Ethics Opinion Precludes Settlements That Require Attorney to Return His or Her Work Product

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The Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility issued a formal Ethics Opinion concluding that a settlement provisions requiring attorneys to turn over documents protected by attorney work product may be prohibited by Rule 5.6(b). Specifically, a lawyer may not propose or agree to a settlement agreement that requires a lawyer to turn over any work product materials as part of the …

U.S. Fifth Circuit Sanctions Defendant Who Contests Liability and Presents Purported Experts in Bad Faith

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“The general rule in federal court, the so-called ‘American Rule,’ is that litigants are responsible for their own fees. Federal courts, however, possess ‘inherent power’ to assess fees as sanctions when the losing party has acted in bad faith, vexatiously, wantonly, or for oppressive reasons. Under this test, sanctions are warranted when a party knowingly or recklessly raises an objectively …

Fifth Circuit Throws Out ERISA Suit against BP over 2010 Spill

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On interlocutory appeal, the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals reversed the denial of BP’s Rule 12 Motion to Dismiss the Amended Complaint of BP pension plan stockholders for breach of fiduciary duty. “In Fifth Third, the Supreme Court stated that the plaintiff’s proposed alternative must be one that ‘a prudent fiduciary in the same circumstances would not have viewed …

Eastern District of North Carolina Certifies Class and Grants Summary Judgment under ERISA on Unpaid Contributions

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Participants filed a putative class action against Trojan Horse and Glen Burnie Hauling for failing to make deposits into their defined contribution 401(k) plan, despite having continued to make such deductions and withholdings from plaintiffs’ wages.  The plaintiffs also joined Ascensus Trust, and sought summary judgment on fiduciary status and breach. The Court found that “the unpaid Plan contributions are …

Louisiana Fourth Circuit Reverses Summary Judgment on Intentional Spoliation Claim

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In summary: “The trial court found Ms. Fiveash failed to present any evidence to establish that Defendants intentionally destroyed evidence with the purpose of depriving her of its use at trial. Louisiana jurisprudence has held summary judgment based on subjective facts like intent is rarely appropriate. The trial court incorrectly relied on self-serving and conclusory affidavits that Defendants offered in …