U.S. Fifth Circuit Affirms Sanction of Attorneys Who Withheld Material Evidence from Rule 26 Disclosures

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The plaintiff in the underlying lawsuit claimed she was sexually assaulted on multiple occasions while incarcerated at the Maverick County Detention Center, operated by the defendant, GEO Group.  During the plaintiff’s deposition, she was confronted with recordings of telephone calls which had not be identified or produced as part of the initial disclosures under Rule 26.  The plaintiff filed a …

ABA Provides Guidance for Attorneys Seeking to Withdraw from Representation

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The ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility was called upon to address the potential conflict between Court Orders and/or Rules requiring the bases for withdrawal of representation and the attorney’s obligation to maintain client confidences.  While the issue was raised in the context of a desired withdrawal for non-payment of fees in particular, the Committee provided guidance that …

Covington & Burling Admonished for Representing Non-Party Witnesses in Depositions

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The defendant, Jacobs, hired Covington & Burling to devlop factual information and defenses relating to Jacobs’ work for the Tennessee Valley Authority.  Among other things, Covington helped identify non-party witnesses who might have factual information regarding the TVA-Jacobs contract.  Covington worked with the witnesses to prepare and submit declarations in support of Jacobs’ Motion to Dismiss, asserting derivative sovereign immunity …

Alaska Bar Association Prohibits Use of “Web Bugs”

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A “web bug” is a technology tool that tracks certain information about the document to which it is attached.  They can be used in e-mail newsletters to help track readers, for example, but can also be used in e-mails to “invisibly” track, among other things: when the email was opened; how long the email was reviewed (including whether it was …

Repeatedly Sanctioned Lawyer Sanctioned for Frivolous Pleadings which Contradict Previous Filings by Same Party

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Bordelon Marine filed suit against Bibby Subsea in Louisiana State Court, seeking to collect on, among other things, unpaid Invoice No. 15-58. The factual statements in the complaint were verified by Wesley D. Bordelon, the President of Bordelon Marine. The defendant removed the case to Federal Court, and moved to stay the matter pending arbitration. The Federal Court subsequently compelled …

Tennessee Formal Ethics Opinion Precludes Settlements That Require Attorney to Return His or Her Work Product

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The Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility issued a formal Ethics Opinion concluding that a settlement provisions requiring attorneys to turn over documents protected by attorney work product may be prohibited by Rule 5.6(b). Specifically, a lawyer may not propose or agree to a settlement agreement that requires a lawyer to turn over any work product materials as part of the …

U.S. Fifth Circuit Sanctions Defendant Who Contests Liability and Presents Purported Experts in Bad Faith

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“The general rule in federal court, the so-called ‘American Rule,’ is that litigants are responsible for their own fees. Federal courts, however, possess ‘inherent power’ to assess fees as sanctions when the losing party has acted in bad faith, vexatiously, wantonly, or for oppressive reasons. Under this test, sanctions are warranted when a party knowingly or recklessly raises an objectively …

Attorney Can Be Sued for Copyright Infringement When Using Substantial Portions of Another’s Brief

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A lawyer copied “substantial portions” of a brief drafted by a co-defendant in a patent case, who was “the owner of a valid and registered copyright” for its brief.  Judge Hatter, sitting in the Central District of California, rejected the defendant’s claim of “fair use”. First, the defendant “did not add new expression, meaning or message to Newegg’s draft brief. …